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EUROvisual: Sweden select Robin Stjernberg

Common sense finally prevailed in the Swedish Eurovision selection round, with 22-year-old pop poppet Robin Stjernberg landing a surprise victory at the Melodifestivalen final on Saturday. His entry, ‘You’, was a big hit with the international juries, but only came second with the Swedish public vote. The bookie’s favourite, ‘Heartbreak Hotel‘ by YOHIO could only scrape into ninth out of ten places after the jury vote before finally rebounding into second place when combined with the public vote.

 

Sweden are unlikely to secure a consecutive win at Eurovision this year, but ‘You’ is a well staged, well executed track that should see Robin Stjernberg finishing on the left side of the scoreboard. Really, it could have been an awful lot worse.

Elsewhere in Europe, Cezar of Romania is kindly providing the first true ‘WTF’ moment of the contest in the form of his song, ‘It’s My Life’.

This truly baffling effort starts as an overly theatrical ballad, before Cezar’s voice ascends into a painful falsetto as the Eurodance beat kicks in. Quite what anyone was thinking throughout the song’s inception and selection we cannot begin to imagine. On the plus side, the obligatory shoehorned-in dubstep breakdown means that if you’re playing the Eurovision 2013 drinking game, you’re only a minute and half a way from downing a pint of vodka, so if you’re lucky you’ll have passed out by the time the second key change rolls round.

It’s difficult to imagine a single report on Finland’s entry, ‘Marry Me’ by Krista Siegfrids, that doesn’t mention a certain faux lesbian and one-time Mrs Brand, so we’re going to get it all out of our system now:

KATY PERRY KATY PERRY KATY PERRY KATY PERRY KATY PERRY KATY PERRY KATY PERRY KATY PERRY KATY PERRY KATY PERRY KATY PERRY KATY PERRY KATY PERRY KATY PERRY KATY PERRY KATY PERRY KATY PERRY KATY PERRY KATY PERRY KATY PERRY KATY PERRY.

Thankfully, Siegfrids doesn’t seem quite as desperate to please as her idol, but she’s still packing a big Max Martin sounding power pop track and her sense of enthusiasm is infectious. Definitely not the most original entry, but the song is certainly memorable – only at Eurovision would ’Oh oh, oh oh, a ding dong’ be considered an acceptable lyric.

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